Oor Wullie The Musical – King's Theatre

Book & Lyrics: Scott Gilmour

Music: Claire McKenzie

Director: Andrew Panton

Being blunt, the concept of drawing on an eighty-year-old comic script – rife with slang, Dundonian heritage and is as quintessentially Scottish as Irn Bru chews and Haggis Pakora could leave a potential unpleasant taste in the mouth if done tacky. Capitalising on nostalgia is by no means a new fad, and Oor Wullie, aye that annual yer granny gets you which you never bothered to pick-up has been delighting kids, and big ones across Scotland for decades. It would also seem, that with the right knack, embracement and know-how, Oor Wullie is a fandabidozi musical.

Coherently nostalgic, yet modern, Claire McKenzie and Scott Gilmour craft a sentimental production which captures a thick vein of Scottish humour while pumping it full of enthusiastic energy, maintaining the comic’s origins, and ensuring a modern spirit of inclusion. Frankly, the coming months will be a trying period for us all, particularly those who may not ‘look’ Scottish enough, thankfully we can look to the past to hopefully lead our future.

Young Scot Wahid, whose parents originate from Pakistan, starts a new school in a country where he has always called home, even if fellow students seem confused about his origins. Finding solace in the library, under the watchful eye of the librarian Dudley, a touching reference to original animator Dudley D. Watkins, Oor Wullie lands himself in trouble again, emerging from the very annual Wahid finds solace in. No longer in Auchenshuggle, Wullie and the gang must adapt to this peculiar world. Through Kenneth Macleod’s vivid designs, directly out of the Sunday Post, emphasising the comic roots for the characters with layers upon layers of colour, effects and one very special Wullie Wagon.

Lifting the skirt of risqué, Oor Wullie capitalises on the countries passionate thirst for double entendres, in-jokes and having a belter of a time. None of the jokes feels harsh or targeted, levelling off as safe for the whole family. The entire cast achieves a brilliant sense of comic timing, particularly Dan Buckley’s Bob and Ann Louise Ross as the charmingly befuddled PC Murdoch. The cheeky chappy himself Martin Quidd tackles the role of Wullie, exaggerating to accentuate the comic-strip background. His chemistry with the entire gang is tangible, but with a touching reflection found in Eklovey Kashyap’s Walid offers a real sentimentality amidst the frolic and fun.

Course, it wouldnae be right to celebrate eighty years of Scotland’s favourite son without a little music, now would it? McKenzie’s musical composition carries Gilmour’s lyrics well, capturing the overall tone of the production. Though a mixed lot vocally, there’s a communal sense to the vocals rather than a polished feel, almost folky. Standout numbers offer a fleshed-out role for Leanne Tarynor’s brilliantly portrayed Basher Mackenzie, and what may at first raises eyebrows as the gang don saris, is a meticulously well-structured number, with taste, humour and delightful choreography courtesy of Chi-San Howard.

All across Scotland Oor Wullie could be found perched upon his pale from the cobbles of Edinburgh to the high streets of Dunfermline and was an expression of the astonishing artistic talents of over two-hundred designs. Now, here is the chance to meet the lad face-to-face, leaping from his two-dimensional form, with a breath of life befitting his cheeky demeanour.

Review originally for Reviewshub: https://www.thereviewshub.com/oor-wullie-the-musical-kings-theatre-edinburgh/

Photo Credit – Tommy Ga-Ken Wan

Avenue Q – King’s Theatre, Edinburgh

Image Contribution: Matt Martin

Music and Lyrics: Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx

Director: Cressida Carre

We’re back on Avenue Q, running for fifteen years the street is still offering up an evening of filth, wickedness and yet holds a mirror up to its audience more than ever. Just when you thought bright colours and puppets were for kids, Avenue Q proves that nothing is as it seems.

Just what can you do with a BA in English? It’s a question I’ve been asking myself for the past three years… For Princeton, a fresh-faced and bushy-tailed graduate, he wanders into Avenue Q in search of his purpose. It’s a peculiar street with friendly faces, some furry and other childhood stars. Meeting Kate Monster, Princeton finds his goals in life share a track with love. Unable to balance the two, a pair of bad idea bears drive him down the wrong path.

An issue with ‘edgy’ humour is that with age It tends to dull. Namely with references to childhood stars of the 80s such as Gary Coleman, who worked as a gag in the 2000s but a current audience has a weaker connection with the actor. In steps Nicholas McLean who portrays Gary in a more energetic performance than past touring productions. It offers rejuvenation to an otherwise tired character. Who does seem to suffer is Brain, a jobless aspiring comedian. Oliver Stanley is perfectly adequate, Brian is already the weakest written part, but he just lacks an oomph required.

There is no doubt that Avenue Q’s crucial selling points are still as impressive as they were 16 years ago. First, it’s slapped up and intoxicated version of Sesame Street puppets. They wouldn’t look out of place on a Saturday morning, through Rick Lyon’s design, they all have an individual personality. In particular the Bad Idea Bears. Those fuzzy inner voices who harmlessly tell us to have one more drink or to treat ourselves. Megan Armstrong and Tom Steedon do a sinfully wonderous job of breathing life to these imaginary tempters.

Besides its puppets, what gives Avenue Q longevity is its soundtrack by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx. Covering power ballads, catchy tunes and perverted showstoppers. The touring cast does an admirable job delivering the numbers, with Steedon and McLean bringing their A-game as Trekkie and Gary Coleman. The Internet is For Porn and Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist still bringing grins to the crowd’s eyes years later. It is Cecily Redman as the downhearted Kate Monster with the tragically underrated There’s a Fine Fine Linewho moves the audience from laughter to genuine heartache.

With emotions clear, there is an issue with projection. Redman herself being able to belt out Peggy Lee inspired notes from Lucy the Slut but tails off on the bolder notes from Kate Monster. Her voices for the two are enjoyable, particularly for Lucy bringing in a husky sultry vibe. Lawrence Smith has just as grand a time with Princeton and Rod. When on stage with Redman, the two are giving it their all with You Can Be As Loud As The Hell You Want.

Does it still cut as deep? Not really. Is it still deep enough to leave a mark? Definitely. Avenue Q was once the filthiest show in the West End and Broadway, now it’s spreading that muck across the nation. It’s raunchy, still hilarious and contains a few surprise emotional moments with some poignant commentary of racism, purpose and reality.

Review Originally Published for Reviews Hub: https://www.thereviewshub.com/avenue-q-kings-theatre-edinburgh-2/

Tickets available from Capital Theatres: https://www.capitaltheatres.com/whats-on/avenueq